90 Day Rehab Programs
90 Day Rehab Programs
1 (844) 762-3701
Our inpatient treatment 90 day rehab programs are for residents who live at the facility and interact with therapists, peers and doctors. When a loved one is slowly dying as a result of drug and alcohol abuse, it’s very alarming to see them continue this course no matter how dangerous, the situation is to their health or life. One of the more fearful things in life is watching a child or loved one disappear into the grip of dependency on drugs and alcohol that can lead to death.
At times it may seem hopeless and extremely difficult to overcome this dilemma but there are solutions to becoming drug and alcohol free.  Many patients have had success with 90 Day Rehab Programs as opposed to shorter term treatments.  The three month process allows the patient time to heal fully and to receive the proper education or counseling to overcome extensive alcohol and drug abuse.

We have often been told that it takes 90 days to create a habit. However long it takes, the mind and body must heal before one can truly address emotional and psychological issues that is related to using alcohol or drugs in an abusive manner.

Once fully detoxed, individuals must learn and relearn much in order to overcome this progressive and fatal illness. Educational seminars and various therapeutic options work together to heal and elevate the individual to a new, happier and healthier self.

Our 90-day rehab programs are specifically designed for addiction treatment which provides the kind of intensive and comprehensive program necessary to fully recover and heal from addiction.  Keep in mind our programs are ideal for anyone who has used alcohol and/or drugs for an extended period of time.
90 Day Rehab Programs
90 day rehab programs
90 day rehab programs
Inpatient Addiction Treatment Centers

One of the main benefits to inpatient rehab centers is that the providers of care have full control of the environment that create success for the patient.  These 90 day rehab programs not only treat the patients but they become residents at the rehab facility and have supervision 24 hours per day.  This level of care is highly recommended when appropriate for those who may have endured dependencies psychologically and/or physical health issues.

What Treatments Are Offered for 90 Day Addiction Rehab Programs?

Our 90 day rehab programs offer help for a variety of addictions for substance abuse disorders and behavioral addictions.  Some of the additions that are treated are listed below:

    Alcohol Addiction
    Cocaine Addiction
    Heroin Addiction
    Marijuana Addiction
    Opioid Addiction
    Prescription Drug Addiction

Methods & Treatment for 90-Day Addiction Rehab


There are many types of rehab programs available for drug acciction. Treatment methods for 90-day drug rehab are focused on groups and people having a common goal, along with regular individual therapy sessions. These groups help the members provide support by others of the same age that can help people stay away from drugs and alcohol. Groups often focus on activities that people wish to complete together and may discuss common problems that the group members share. These groups may include:

    Behavioral therapy.
    Cognitive-behavioral therapy.
    Family sessions.
    Psychoeducational sessions.
    Non-12-step programs.
    Non-spiritual programs.
    12-step programs with group meetings.

What Happens During 90-Day Addiction Rehab?

The first step in the process is intake, which is when the patient meets with a counselor to provide a detailed history of the addiction to be treated, as well as any pertinent medical and mental health considerations, in order to determine the best course of treatment. When a person starts addiction rehab, the first step is intake.  During intake, program rules will be explained, as well as completion of consents forms and any other necessary paperwork.

Following the intake step is detoxification (detox). Detox can vary from a few days or a few weeks, depending on the addiction. An inpatient structured detox rehab facility allows people to withdraw from various abused substances in a safe and comfortable atmosphere.

After detox, patients will transition into ongoing addiction therapy for the remainder of the rehab duration. Addiction therapy includes a number of behavioral therapeutic techniques and, in some cases, medication-assisted treatment interventions to address an individual’s recovery needs.

Prior to completion of a 90-day substance abuse treatment program, aftercare planning will take place. A strong aftercare plan can make all the difference when it comes to long-term sobriety. Various aftercare programs, including sober living arrangements, ongoing outpatient group therapy, individual substance abuse counseling appointments, and regular 12-step or other support group meeting attendance can help people stay on course once the initial period of rehabilitation has ended.

Brief Interventions

Individuals identified with mild-to-moderate drinking problems may benefit most from a brief intervention, a time-limited, client-centered counseling strategy focused on changing behavior and improving compliance with therapy. Brief interventions typically include five components:

   * A statement of medical concern from the counselor or health care provider about the client’s alcohol use.
   * Screening and assessment to determine the nature of the alcohol problem.
   * Feedback and advice on how to abstain from or reduce alcohol use.
   * A course of action that sets specific goals for abstaining from drinking or reducing alcohol consumption.
   * A summary of the discussion and the agreed-on course of action and the scheduling of a follow-up appointment.

Brief interventions usually can be conducted in less than half an hour, making them especially useful in settings in which health care providers have limited time, such as hospitals, primary care clinics, and urgent care facilities.

Treatment Approaches

   
People with mild-to-moderate alcohol use problems often respond well to brief interventions. However, those diagnosed with alcohol use disorders or dependence require more intensive behavioral treatment approaches, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement therapy.

Motivational enhancement therapy encourages clients to use their own resources to change their behavior. Based on a therapist’s assessment of the type and severity of clients’ drinking-associated problems, clients receive structured feedback to stimulate their motivation to change. Research has shown that cognitive behavioral and motivational therapies have comparable long-term success rates.  Another approach, known as 12-Step facilitation, adapts traditional 12-Step methods to behavioral therapy.

Cognitive behavioral approaches to alcohol treatment help clients identify high-risk, relapse situations; learn and rehearse strategies for coping with these situations; and recognize and cope with their cravings for alcohol and its effects Clients participate in role-playing activities and are assigned homework to help develop behavioral and cognitive skills that enable them to cope better with situations that might tempt them to resume former alcohol habits.

Treating Alcohol Problems

Most people who drink do so without adverse consequences. However, some may develop alcohol problems that require some type of intervention or treatment. Nearly two-thirds of the 3.5 million persons who received treatment for a substance use disorder in the past year received treatment for alcohol problems—an estimated 2.4 million persons (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA] ). Problem alcohol use can lead to various physical, psychological, and social consequences. Early detection and treatment of alcohol problems can minimize or prevent these consequences and related costs. This issue of Substance Abuse in Brief discusses several aspects of treatment, including identifying problem alcohol use, applying brief interventions, introducing behavioral treatment approaches, and providing supportive services and appropriate treatments.

Identifying Alcohol Problems

Identifying risky drinking behavior, alcohol abuse, or alcohol dependence can be difficult. Related health, social, and personal problems often develop slowly and may not be detected without a precipitating event such as a workplace crisis, an incident involving the police, or an alcohol-related automobile crash. In addition, people often are reluctant to acknowledge or discuss alcohol-related problems, even with their doctors. One study found that approximately half of those with alcohol use disorders never mentioned the problem to their doctors and, of those who did, only half were diagnosed as a result. Studies such as this point to the importance of routine screening and assessment by primary care providers to detect and identify problems with alcohol consumption (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment [CSAT] 1997).

Health care providers have a unique opportunity to identify individuals in their care with substance use disorders at an early stage. Health care providers should screen all patients routinely for problems with alcohol by asking questions to learn how much alcohol they drink and how often. They also should ask whether patients’ use of alcohol creates problems in their daily lives and relationships, such as frequent absences from work or arguments with family members about alcohol use. Various screening tests for alcohol use are available for use by the trained health care clinician, including Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) questionnaires and the CAGE instrument. Regardless of length or type, screening instruments have the same goal—to identify individuals who are or may become problem drinkers.

When health care providers ask specific questions about alcohol use, patients have an opportunity to share their concerns and reportedly are two to three times more likely to speak again about their alcohol use with a health care professional. In addition, when such discussions include other health topics such as exercise, diet, weight control, and medications, both providers and patients may feel more comfortable discussing problems with alcohol or other substance use (CSAT 1997). Once an alcohol problem is identified, finding appropriate treatment for the individual is the next step. The level of treatment required depends on the type and severity of alcohol use and any associated problems the person may have. For example, a person with mild alcohol problems usually can benefit from a brief intervention; someone with more severe alcohol problems may require specialized treatment services. To guide treatment planning further, a substance abuse treatment specialist or a physician trained in addiction medicine also can assess the person’s mental and behavioral status.
What Happens After 90 Day Rehab Programs for Addiction?
90 day rehab programs
After a 90 Day Rehab Program, you’ll have several options for aftercare. Throughout the treatment stay during recovery, the staff works with patients to develop a personal plan for aftercare. This can include continuing treatment in an outpatient facility, where individual and group therapy sessions are held on a continual basis.

Attending private individual counseling can also be highly effective at preventing relapse. Attending 12-step or other types of self-help programs is another good aftercare choice. This allows for the development of a strong, sober support group, as well as rewarding positive behavior, and modeling of healthy, sober behaviors.

Self-help meetings are often hosted by inpatient facilities, to provide a transition into meetings. Attending meetings after completion of a 90-day addiction rehab program can make it easier to reintegrate into one’s daily life without having to drink or use drugs.

Be  sure to inquire about your chosen recovery center for sober living and extended care for recovery. Sober living environments can be used as halfway houses to support your sobriety as you transition back into the “real” world outside the treatment center. This can be beneficial to some people after addiction rehab.

Aftercare and outpatient therapies that are continued after rehab can also be very helpful. Each addiction treatment facility may have different options.
Who Needs Drug Abuse Treatment?

One of the first questions that should be asked when determining whether you or someone close to you needs drug abuse rehab treatment is whether the issue of drug abuse is out of control. Individuals who are not able to control their use of prescription medications and/or illicit drugs may require drug rehab services. In many cases, those who have a drug abuse problem will go to extensive lengths in order to hide their addiction. A person with a drug abuse problem may also exhibit the following symptoms:

    Glassy or red eyes.
    Withdrawal from family and/or friends.
    Mood swings.
    Irritability.
    Sudden changes in behavior.
    Careless in regards to personal grooming/hygiene.
    Runny or sniffy nose.
    Changes in sleeping habits such as being up at night & sleeping during the day.
    Lack of interest in favorite activities.

Treatment and Recovery
Can addiction be treated successfully?


Yes. Addiction is a treatable disease. Research in the science of addiction and the treatment of substance use disorders has led to the development of evidence-based interventions that help people stop abusing drugs and resume productive lives.

Can addiction be cured?

Not always—but like other chronic diseases, addiction can be managed successfully. Treatment enables people to counteract addiction’s powerful disruptive effects on their brain and behavior and regain control of their lives.

Does relapse to drug abuse mean treatment has failed?

No. The chronic nature of the disease means that relapsing to drug abuse at some point is not only possible, but likely. Relapse rates (i.e., how often symptoms recur) for people with addiction and other substance use disorders are similar to relapse rates for other well-understood chronic medical illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, which also have both physiological and behavioral components. Treatment of chronic diseases involves changing deeply imbedded behaviors, and relapse does not mean treatment has failed. For a person recovering from addiction, lapsing back to drug use indicates that treatment needs to be reinstated or adjusted or that another treatment should be tried.

Medications Used To Treat Drug Addiction

    Tobacco Addiction
        Nicotine replacement therapies (available as a patch, inhaler, or gum)
        Bupropion
        Varenicline
    Opioid Addiction
        Methadone
        Buprenorphine
        Naltrexone
    Alcohol and Drug Addiction
        Naltrexone
        Disulfiram
        Acamprosate

90 Day Rehab Programs
90 day rehab programs
Call Now!
844-762-3701
Our inpatient treatment 90 day rehab programs are for residents who live at the facility and interact with therapists, peers and doctors. When a loved one is slowly dying as a result of drug and alcohol abuse, it’s very alarming to see them continue this course no matter how dangerous, the situation is to their health or life. One of the more fearful things in life is watching a child or loved one disappear into the grip of dependency on drugs and alcohol that can lead to death.
90 day rehab progams
At times it may seem hopeless and extremely difficult to overcome this dilemma but there are solutions to becoming drug and alcohol free.  Many patients have had success with 90 Day Rehab Programs as opposed to shorter term treatments.  The three month process allows the patient time to heal fully and to receive the proper education or counseling to overcome extensive alcohol and drug abuse.

We have often been told that it takes 90 days to create a habit. However long it takes, the mind and body must heal before one can truly address emotional and psychological issues that is related to using alcohol or drugs in an abusive manner.

Once fully detoxed, individuals must learn and relearn much in order to overcome this progressive and fatal illness. Educational seminars and various therapeutic options work together to heal and elevate the individual to a new, happier and healthier self.

Our 90-day rehab programs are specifically designed for addiction treatment which provides the kind of intensive and comprehensive program necessary to fully recover and heal from addiction.  Keep in mind our programs are ideal for anyone who has used alcohol and/or drugs for an extended period of time.
90 day rehab programs
Inpatient Addiction Treatment Centers

One of the main benefits to inpatient rehab centers is that the providers of care have full control of the environment that create success for the patient.  These 90 day rehab programs not only treat the patients but they become residents at the rehab facility and have supervision 24 hours per day.  This level of care is highly recommended when appropriate for those who may have endured dependencies psychologically and/or physical health issues.

What Treatments Are Offered for 90 Day Addiction Rehab Programs?

Our 90 day rehab programs offer help for a variety of addictions for substance abuse disorders and behavioral addictions.  Some of the additions that are treated are listed below:

    Alcohol Addiction
    Cocaine Addiction
    Heroin Addiction
    Marijuana Addiction
    Opioid Addiction
    Prescription Drug Addiction

Methods & Treatment for 90-Day Addiction Rehab

There are many types of rehab programs available for drug acciction. Treatment methods for 90-day drug rehab are focused on groups and people having a common goal, along with regular individual therapy sessions. These groups help the members provide support by others of the same age that can help people stay away from drugs and alcohol. Groups often focus on activities that people wish to complete together and may discuss common problems that the group members share. These groups may include:

    Behavioral therapy.
    Cognitive-behavioral therapy.
    Family sessions.
    Psychoeducational sessions.
    Non-12-step programs.
    Non-spiritual programs.
    12-step programs with group meetings.

What Happens During 90-Day Addiction Rehab?

The first step in the process is intake, which is when the patient meets with a counselor to provide a detailed history of the addiction to be treated, as well as any pertinent medical and mental health considerations, in order to determine the best course of treatment. When a person starts addiction rehab, the first step is intake.  During intake, program rules will be explained, as well as completion of consents forms and any other necessary paperwork.

Following the intake step is detoxification (detox). Detox can vary from a few days or a few weeks, depending on the addiction. An inpatient structured detox rehab facility allows people to withdraw from various abused substances in a safe and comfortable atmosphere.

After detox, patients will transition into ongoing addiction therapy for the remainder of the rehab duration. Addiction therapy includes a number of behavioral therapeutic techniques and, in some cases, medication-assisted treatment interventions to address an individual’s recovery needs.

Prior to completion of a 90-day substance abuse treatment program, aftercare planning will take place. A strong aftercare plan can make all the difference when it comes to long-term sobriety. Various aftercare programs, including sober living arrangements, ongoing outpatient group therapy, individual substance abuse counseling appointments, and regular 12-step or other support group meeting attendance can help people stay on course once the initial period of rehabilitation has ended.

Brief Interventions

Individuals identified with mild-to-moderate drinking problems may benefit most from a brief intervention, a time-limited, client-centered counseling strategy focused on changing behavior and improving compliance with therapy. Brief interventions typically include five components:

A statement of medical concern from the counselor or health care provider about the client’s alcohol use.
  
Screening and assessment to determine the nature of the alcohol problem.
  
Feedback and advice on how to abstain from or reduce alcohol use.
  
A course of action that sets specific goals for abstaining from drinking or reducing alcohol consumption.
 
A summary of the discussion and the agreed-on course of action and the scheduling of a follow-up appointment.

Brief interventions usually can be conducted in less than half an hour, making them especially useful in settings in which health care providers have limited time, such as hospitals, primary care clinics, and urgent care facilities.

Treatment Approaches
   
People with mild-to-moderate alcohol use problems often respond well to brief interventions. However, those diagnosed with alcohol use disorders or dependence require more intensive behavioral treatment approaches, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement therapy.

Motivational enhancement therapy encourages clients to use their own resources to change their behavior. Based on a therapist’s assessment of the type and severity of clients’ drinking-associated problems, clients receive structured feedback to stimulate their motivation to change. Research has shown that cognitive behavioral and motivational therapies have comparable long-term success rates.  Another approach, known as 12-Step facilitation, adapts traditional 12-Step methods to behavioral therapy.

Cognitive behavioral approaches to alcohol treatment help clients identify high-risk, relapse situations; learn and rehearse strategies for coping with these situations; and recognize and cope with their cravings for alcohol and its effects Clients participate in role-playing activities and are assigned homework to help develop behavioral and cognitive skills that enable them to cope better with situations that might tempt them to resume former alcohol habits.

Treating Alcohol Problems

Most people who drink do so without adverse consequences. However, some may develop alcohol problems that require some type of intervention or treatment. Nearly two-thirds of the 3.5 million persons who received treatment for a substance use disorder in the past year received treatment for alcohol problems—an estimated 2.4 million persons (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA] ). Problem alcohol use can lead to various physical, psychological, and social consequences. Early detection and treatment of alcohol problems can minimize or prevent these consequences and related costs. This issue of Substance Abuse in Brief discusses several aspects of treatment, including identifying problem alcohol use, applying brief interventions, introducing behavioral treatment approaches, and providing supportive services and appropriate treatments.

Identifying Alcohol Problems

Identifying risky drinking behavior, alcohol abuse, or alcohol dependence can be difficult. Related health, social, and personal problems often develop slowly and may not be detected without a precipitating event such as a workplace crisis, an incident involving the police, or an alcohol-related automobile crash. In addition, people often are reluctant to acknowledge or discuss alcohol-related problems, even with their doctors. One study found that approximately half of those with alcohol use disorders never mentioned the problem to their doctors and, of those who did, only half were diagnosed as a result. Studies such as this point to the importance of routine screening and assessment by primary care providers to detect and identify problems with alcohol consumption (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment [CSAT] 1997).

Health care providers have a unique opportunity to identify individuals in their care with substance use disorders at an early stage. Health care providers should screen all patients routinely for problems with alcohol by asking questions to learn how much alcohol they drink and how often. They also should ask whether patients’ use of alcohol creates problems in their daily lives and relationships, such as frequent absences from work or arguments with family members about alcohol use. Various screening tests for alcohol use are available for use by the trained health care clinician, including Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) questionnaires and the CAGE instrument. Regardless of length or type, screening instruments have the same goal—to identify individuals who are or may become problem drinkers.

When health care providers ask specific questions about alcohol use, patients have an opportunity to share their concerns and reportedly are two to three times more likely to speak again about their alcohol use with a health care professional. In addition, when such discussions include other health topics such as exercise, diet, weight control, and medications, both providers and patients may feel more comfortable discussing problems with alcohol or other substance use (CSAT 1997). Once an alcohol problem is identified, finding appropriate treatment for the individual is the next step. The level of treatment required depends on the type and severity of alcohol use and any associated problems the person may have. For example, a person with mild alcohol problems usually can benefit from a brief intervention; someone with more severe alcohol problems may require specialized treatment services. To guide treatment planning further, a substance abuse treatment specialist or a physician trained in addiction medicine also can assess the person’s mental and behavioral status.
What Happens After 90 Day Rehab Programs for Addiction?
90 day rehab programs
After a 90 Day Rehab Program, you’ll have several options for aftercare. Throughout the treatment stay during recovery, the staff works with patients to develop a personal plan for aftercare. This can include continuing treatment in an outpatient facility, where individual and group therapy sessions are held on a continual basis.

Attending private individual counseling can also be highly effective at preventing relapse. Attending 12-step or other types of self-help programs is another good aftercare choice. This allows for the development of a strong, sober support group, as well as rewarding positive behavior, and modeling of healthy, sober behaviors.

Self-help meetings are often hosted by inpatient facilities, to provide a transition into meetings. Attending meetings after completion of a 90-day addiction rehab program can make it easier to reintegrate into one’s daily life without having to drink or use drugs.

Be  sure to inquire about your chosen recovery center for sober living and extended care for recovery. Sober living environments can be used as halfway houses to support your sobriety as you transition back into the “real” world outside the treatment center. This can be beneficial to some people after addiction rehab.

Aftercare and outpatient therapies that are continued after rehab can also be very helpful. Each addiction treatment facility may have different options.
Who Needs Drug Abuse Treatment?

One of the first questions that should be asked when determining whether you or someone close to you needs drug abuse rehab treatment is whether the issue of drug abuse is out of control. Individuals who are not able to control their use of prescription medications and/or illicit drugs may require drug rehab services. In many cases, those who have a drug abuse problem will go to extensive lengths in order to hide their addiction. A person with a drug abuse problem may also exhibit the following symptoms:

    Glassy or red eyes.
    Withdrawal from family and/or friends.
    Mood swings.
    Irritability.
    Sudden changes in behavior.
    Careless to personal grooming/hygiene.
    Runny or sniffy nose.
    Changes in sleeping habits up all night.
    Lack of interest in favorite activities.

Treatment and Recovery
Can addiction be treated successfully?


Yes. Addiction is a treatable disease. Research in the science of addiction and the treatment of substance use disorders has led to the development of evidence-based interventions that help people stop abusing drugs and resume productive lives.

Can addiction be cured?

Not always—but like other chronic diseases, addiction can be managed successfully. Treatment enables people to counteract addiction’s powerful disruptive effects on their brain and behavior and regain control of their lives.

Does relapse to drug abuse mean treatment has failed?

No. The chronic nature of the disease means that relapsing to drug abuse at some point is not only possible, but likely. Relapse rates (i.e., how often symptoms recur) for people with addiction and other substance use disorders are similar to relapse rates for other well-understood chronic medical illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, which also have both physiological and behavioral components. Treatment of chronic diseases involves changing deeply imbedded behaviors, and relapse does not mean treatment has failed. For a person recovering from addiction, lapsing back to drug use indicates that treatment needs to be reinstated or adjusted or that another treatment should be tried.

Medications Used To Treat Drug Addiction

    Tobacco Addiction
        Nicotine replacement therapies (available as a patch, inhaler, or gum)
        Bupropion
        Varenicline
    Opioid Addiction
        Methadone
        Buprenorphine
        Naltrexone
    Alcohol and Drug Addiction
        Naltrexone
        Disulfiram
        Acamprosate

Click On The Link Below To Get Resources To Help You
You're Just One Step Away To Get On The Road to Recovery
Click On The Link Below To Get Resources
 To Help You Recover!
You're Just One Step Away To Get On The Road to Recovery
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